Office of Hawaiian Affairs looks for short-term users in Kakaako Makai

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs is seeking short-term uses for several parcels in Kakaako Makai, where the agency acquired some 30 acres three years ago from the state of Hawaii in a deal meant to resolve a decades-long dispute.

Peter Apo, a trustee for OHA, told attendees at a recent Hawaii Society of Business Professionals event in Honolulu that it is looking for ideas from developers for about six lots in Kakaako Makai.

On Monday, OHA said it secured a lease with Street Grindz, the company that does Eat the Street, Honolulu Night Market and Art After Dark, at the former Fisherman’s Wharf site for “daily activities.”

“Now that we are landowners, we are on the hot seat,” Apo said at the event, which focused on the area. “We have to do something that people will feel good about. It’s a tricky navigation [process].”

He noted that OHA recently completed its first round of statewide meetings, with more on the way.

“It was a very intensive two-and-a-half weeks of direct engagement with communities across the state,” Apo said.

OHA awarded a nearly $3 million contract to a partnership of four Hawaiian firms, including Edith Kanakaole Foundation, DTL, PBR Hawaii and WCIT Architecture.

The contract, which requires its leadership team to actively get input from the Hawaiian community during the master planning for Kakaako Makai, is expected to take two years to fulfill.

The 30 acres in Honolulu that OHA acquired from the state are valued at an estimated $200 million.

Apo pointed out that all the major landowners in Kakaako, including The Howard Hughes Corp. (NYSE: HHC) and Kamehameha Schools need to work together.

“We will never have an opportunity where you have only three landowners,” he said. “One proposal we had put out there was the three landowners putting Hawaiian plants in Kakaako, and maybe do botanical tours for children.”

Apo said the end result for Kakaako, if all three landowners are on the same page, would be developing a world-class destination for locals and visitors.

OHA’s proposal to build residential high-rises in the area was shot down by state lawmakers last year.

Duane Shimogawa Reporter – Pacific Business News

Honolulu’s iconic Fisherman’s Wharf building torn down

The Fisherman's Wharf building in Honolulu, which stood for nearly seven decades, was torn down Thursday.

The Fisherman’s Wharf building in Honolulu, which stood for nearly seven decades, was torn down Thursday.

The iconic Fisherman’s Wharf Restaurant building in Honolulu, which stood along Ala Moana Boulevard for nearly seven decades, was demolished on Thursday to make way for a redevelopment of the property.

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the owner of the property, officially started preparations to take down the aging structure earlier this month.

PBN first reported that the building at 1011 Ala Moana Blvd. was coming down soon as a demolition permit had been pulled by LVI Environmental Services Inc., which merged with NCM Group Holdings LLC in April to form NorthStar Group Holdings LLC.

North Star Contracting Group Inc. in Waipio fenced off the dilapidated 10,000-square-feet, two-story building as part of the demolition project, which called for salvaging the two restaurant signs atop the roof of the building as well as a free-standing restaurant sign at ground level and incorporating them into future development at the site.

The land is part of 30 acres OHA has owned in Kakaako Makai since August 2012. The land, which was conveyed to OHA, resolved its claims to past-due revenue generated by the state’s use of public trust lands for the period Nov. 7, 1978 through June 20, 2012.

The land includes about 25 acres in Kakaako Makai, including the Fisherman’s Wharf property.

The demolition project is happening at a time when OHA is drawing up a master plan focused on fulfilling the potential for the properties in Kakaako Makai to generate revenue that could support the agency’s efforts to fund community-based programs aimed at improving conditions for Native Hawaiians.

The state agency has chosen a design team to develop a plan for the 30 acres in Kakaako Makai, including the Kuhikuhi Puuone Collaborative, a partnership of four Hawaiian firms, including Edith Kanakaole Foundation, DTL, PBR Hawaii and WCIT Architecture.

Duane Shimogawa Reporter – Pacific Business News

Honolulu’s Fisherman’s Wharf building to be demolished by end of year

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs said Wednesday that it started the process to demolish the shuttered Fisherman's Wharf Restaurant building.

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs said Wednesday that it started the process to demolish the shuttered Fisherman’s Wharf Restaurant building.

The Fisherman’s Wharf Restaurant in Honolulu will be torn down by the end of this year, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs said that it was officially starting preparations on Wednesday for the 67-year-old building’s demolition.

PBN first reported that the building at 1011 Ala Moana Blvd. was coming down soon as a demolition permit had been pulled by LVI Environmental Services Inc., which along with NCM Group Holdings LLC, two of the top providers of demolition and remediation services in the country, merged in April to form NorthStar Group Holdings LLC.

North Star Contracting Group Inc. in Waipio has started fencing off the dilapidated 10,000-square-feet, two-story building as part of the demolition project, which calls for salvaging the two restaurant signs atop the roof of the building as well as a free-standing restaurant sign at ground level and incorporating them into future development at the site.

The land is part of 30 acres OHA has owned in Kakaako Makai since August 2012, after the state and the agency officially reached a $200 million agreement to settle decades of disputes over ceded lands, the crown lands that were transferred to the Territory of Hawaii and later to the state. The land, which was conveyed to OHA, includes about 25 acres in Kakaako Makai, including the Fisherman’s Wharf property.

Private investors and others who had previously expressed interest in the property, but the building — which was built around 1940 — has become too cost-prohibitive to renovate, said OHA, which also noted that the demolition project is a direct response to health and safety concerns stemming from the building, which has become infested with termites and rats after sitting vacant for a few years.

The demolition project is happening at a time when OHA is drawing up a master plan focused on fulfilling the potential for the properties in Kakaako Makai to generate revenue that could support the agency’s efforts to fund community-based programs aimed at improving conditions for Native Hawaiians.

The state agency has chosen a design team to develop a plan for the 30 acres in Kakaako Makai, including the Kuhikuhi Puuone Collaborative, a partnership of four Hawaiian firms, including Edith Kanakaole Foundation, DTL, PBR Hawaii and WCIT Architecture .

“We expect to keep any inconvenience from the demolition to a minimum as this project allows us to address a serious health hazard and put us on a path to establish in the area a new presence that reflects a Hawaiian sense of place,” OHA CEO Kamanaopono Crabbe said in a statement.

The Fisherman’s Wharf restaurant has been closed since 2009. The owner of Pizza Bob’s in Haleiwa on Oahu’s North Shore once planned to open at the shuttered restaurant after winning a lease with the state for the space at the corner of Ala Moana Boulevard and Ward Avenue in 2010.

In March, OHA sent out a request for proposals for the demolition of the Fisherman’s Wharf building.

Duane Shimogawa Reporter – Pacific Business News

Fisherman’s Wharf building in Honolulu closer to being demolished

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs is planning to demolish the Fisherman's Wharf building in Honolulu, which is become an eyesore since the restaurant closed.

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs is planning to demolish the Fisherman’s Wharf building in Honolulu, which is become an eyesore since the restaurant closed.

The iconic 67-year-old Fisherman’s Wharf building at Kewalo Basin in Honolulu is getting closer to being demolished.

The state Office of Hawaiian Affairs, which owns the shuttered restaurant building at 1011 Ala Moana Blvd., was recently issued a permit to demolish the 7,441-square-foot, two-story building, which has become an eyesore over the years.

OHA has contracted New York-based LVI Environmental Services Inc. to do the demolition work, which is estimated to cost about $186,000, the permit said.

The Fisherman’s Wharf restaurant has been closed since 2009. The owner of Pizza Bob’s in Haleiwa on Oahu’s North Shore once planned to open at the shuttered restaurant after winning a lease with the state for the space at the corner of Ala Moana Boulevard and Ward Avenue in 2010.

Then in 2012, the state of Hawaii and OHA officially reached a $200 million agreement to settle decades of disputes over ceded lands.

The land, which was conveyed to the state agency, includes about 25 acres in Kakaako Makai, including the Fisherman’s Wharf property.

In March, OHA sent out a request for proposals for the demolition of the Fisherman’s Wharf building.

An OHA spokesman on Monday told PBN there is no deadline to tear down the building.

Duane Shimogawa Reporter – Pacific Business News

Office of Hawaiian Affairs selects team to develop plan for Kakaako Makai

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs has chosen a design team to develop a plan for the 30 acres in Kakaako Makai the state agency acquired two years ago from the state of Hawaii in a deal meant to resolve a dispute that dates back to when it formed in 1978.

OHA has awarded a $2.9 million contract to the Kuhikuhi Puuone Collaborative, a partnership of four Hawaiian firms, including Edith Kanakaole Foundation, DTL, PBR Hawaii and WCIT Architecture, the state agency said Thursday.

The contract, which requires its leadership team to actively get input from the Hawaiian community during the master planning for Kakaako Makai, is expected to take two years to fulfill.

The 30 acres in Honolulu that OHA acquired from the state are valued at an estimated $200 million.

The conceptual master plan for the nine parcels fits into the agency’s strategic priority to be able to use the land to generate significant revenue to meet demand for such OHA resources as the $1.3 million, on average, it lends annually to Hawaiian business and consumers.

“This new partnership moves us a step closer toward realizing the longer-term vision for Kakaako Makai,” OHA CEO Kamanaopono Crabbe said in a statement. “We look forward to encouraging collaboration in developing a conceptual master plan for Kakaako Makai.”

This past legislative session, state lawmakers killed a proposal to allow OHA to build residential high-rises in the area of Kakaako between Ala Moana Boulevard and the Pacific Ocean.OHA was seeking an exemption from a 2006 law that bans residential construction in Kakaako Makai.

The agency has said it wants to build two 400-foot condominium towers and several other structures 200 feet high close to Ala Moana Boulevard but not near the coastline.

Duane Shimogawa Reporter – Pacific Business News

Lawmakers reject OHA’s bid for Kakaako towers

Lawmakers reject OHA’s bid for Kakaako towers

By Andrew Gomes

The state Office of Hawaiian Affairs was denied in its bid to develop residential towers on a couple of large parcels in Kakaako Friday evening after House leaders in the Legislature dramatically altered a bill sought by OHA and then rejected that draft citing a lack of support from OHA.

The death of Senate Bill 3122 decided one of the most controversial bills at the Legislature this year, and came after three days of negotiations in a joint House-Senate conference committee that was capped by a long day of suspense.

OHA officials were clearly frustrated by how SB 3122 was treated, while opponents of allowing residential use on OHA land in Kakaako makai of Ala Moana Boulevard rejoiced in the bill’s fate.

“It’s unfortunate how things went down,” said Kawika Burgess, OHA’s chief operating officer. “I’m disappointed.”

OHA, a state agency established to benefit Native Hawaiians, had sought permission to develop residential towers on a portion of nine Kakaako-makai parcels that the state conveyed to the agency in 2012 to settle a long-disputed debt over ceded-land revenues owed by the state

OHA sought SB 3122 because residential development can produce more income for its programs and services benefiting Native Hawaiians. The agency insisted that development on its land would have been done in a way that balances commerce and culture without inhibiting public access to the shoreline.

SB 3122 opponents argued that OHA shouldn’t be seeking additional income because it accepted the Kakaako land as an asset valued at roughly $200 million and limited to commercial development.

Earlier Friday, OHA officials announced that they did not support a proposed amendment from House leaders that would have broaden an area in Kakaako makai of Ala Moana Boulevard for residential high-rise development.

The proposal made by Rep. Cindy Evans would permit 400-foot residential towers to rise on eight large parcels between Ala Moana Boulevard and Ilalo Street — four owned by Kamehameha Schools, two owned by OHA and two owned by the state.

A competing proposal offered by Senate leaders supportive of OHA would have allowed residential towers on just two parcels owned by OHA. Previously, SB 3122 aimed to allow residential development on three OHA parcels.

House Speaker Joe Souki issued a statement saying that committee conferees could not agree on a compromise. He cited OHA’s lack of support for the latest House proposal. “We look forward to working with OHA during the interim to find solutions to help maximize the value of OHA’s Kakaako properties,” he said.

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